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Rummynose Tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus)

Rummynose Tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus)
Name: Rummynose Tetra
Other Names: Brilliant Rummy-nose Tetra
Scientific Name: Hemigrammus bleheri
Family: Characidae (subfamily Tetragonopteridae)

Distribution: lower Amazon River basin and Orinoco River basin
Length: 2"
Diet: In the wild, they eat small live foods and some plant matter. In captivity, they'll take small live foods and prepared foods for typical tropical fishes.
Water temperature: 72 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (22-25 degrees Celsius)
Water Chemistry: Very soft to slightly hard water (dH between 3 and 15)
pH: 5.5-7.0
Lifespan: 3-7 years

Species Description The caudal fin is an alternating black- and white-striped bifurcated pennant. These are streamlined, laterally-compressed and faded yellow fish with a little bit of red. This red is found in the "rummy-nose", which, unlike the other Rummynoses, extends past the gill. There are also distinctive black spots at both the top and bottom of the caudal peduncle and an indistinct black streak from center of caudal fin to 1/3 of the body forward.

Species Behaviour Very shy unless they are kept in groups of 4+.

Natural Conditions Slow-moving shady blackwater streams

Natural Range lower Amazon River basin and Orinoco River basin

Minimum recommended tank size 20 gallons

Water Temperature 72 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (22-25 degrees Celsius)

Water Quality They need water with dH between 3 and 15 and an acidic pH (5.5-7.0 in their case).

Sexing Females are plumper than males.

Breeding While easier to breed than some congeners (H. bleheri springs to mind), the Rummynose is still tough to breed. They need somewhat acidic and soft water and increased heat as well as conditioning through the feeding of live foods.

Once in condition, they spawn as the typical egg-scattering tetras do. They are egg- and fry-eaters, so they need to be removed after spawning.

Feeding In the wild, they eat small live foods and some plant matter. In captivity, they'll take small live foods and prepared foods for typical tropical fishes.

Miscellaneous Info There are no synonyms for this fish, which was described by Ahl in 1924.
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