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Marbled Hatchetfish (Carnegiella strigata)

Marbled Hatchetfish (Carnegiella strigata)
Name: Marbled Hatchetfish
Scientific Name: Carnegiella strigata
Family: Gastropelecidae

Distribution: Amazon River in Peru and Brazil
Length: 2"
Diet: Insects resting on or flying above the water in the wild. Live foods and high-protein flakes and pellets in captivity.
Water Temperature: 75 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit (24-28 degrees Celsius)
Water Chemistry: Soft (dH < 5)
pH: 6.5-7
Lifespan: 5 years


Species Description These are triangular, laterally-compressed, large-bellied golden fish with transparent fins. The eponymous marbling is done in brown stripes throughout the body. Like other hatchets, they have large bifurcated caudal fins, small ventral fins and large pectorals which are used as gliding implements in their jumping activities.

Species Behaviour Have the tank fully-covered! These fishes are quite nervous and great jumpers. Innumerable hatchetfishes have jumped to their deaths because of nervousness (or ostensibly because they are trying to prey upon terrestrial insects).

They are peaceful yet active and do best in the company of conspecifics. A shoal of six or more will make them somewhat calmer but they should still be kept as if they will jump at any moment.

Natural Conditions They live in slow-moving creeks and close to the banks of small rivers.

Natural Range Amazon River basin in Peru and Brazil

Minimum recommended tank size 15 gallons

Water Temperature 75 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit (24-28 degrees Celsius)

Water Quality They like soft acidic water. (dH < 5, pH between 6.5 and 7)

Sexing Females have a tendency to have plumper abdomens than those of males.

Breeding They will spawn among floating plants. Parents should be removed after spawning as they will eat eggs and fry.

Fry may be raised on infusoria/green water at the start and will then graduate to baby brine shrimp and Daphnia ssp. water fleas.

Feeding Insects resting on or flying above the water in the wild. Live foods and high-protein flakes and pellets in captivity.
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