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Fat Sleeper Goby (Dormitator maculatus)

Fat Sleeper Goby (Dormitator maculatus)
Name: Fat Sleeper Goby
Other Names: Spotted Sleeper Goby, Striped Sleeper Goby, Jade Sleeper Goby
Scientific Name: Dormitator maculatus
Family: Eleotridae

Distribution: North Carolina or Virginia, the Bahamas and northern Gulf of Mexico to southeastern Brazil.
Length: 26"
Water Temperature: 72 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (22-25 degrees Celsius)
Diet: They eat copeopods, ostracods and insects in the wild (and incidentally ingest water hyacinth parts). They can eat flakes in the aquarium and may take them greedily. That having been said, some sources correctly say that there are a lot of D. maculatus individuals who won't eat prepared foods, so the aquarist should be prepared to feed his or her D. maculatus live foods (including live fishes) throughout their life.
Water Chemistry: 25% seawater best; hard freshwater or even full seawater are options.
pH: 7-8.5
Lifespan: 10 years

Species Description This is a large, stocky, somewhat tube-shaped fish with a flat head. It is dark brown to olive in its base coloration and is mottled with brown, blue and green. There is a dark blue smudge at the upper margin of the operculum. There are also dark lines from behind the eye onto the cheek and horizontal rows of spots which sometimes become dark lines.

The anal fin of this fish has blue bars and white edges.

Species Behaviour These fish will eat anything that tastes good and fits in their mouths. They love a chance to hide away. Fat Sleepers are inveterate diggers, so the aquarist should be ready to provide them with adequate filtration.

Natural Conditions These fish live in freshwater ponds, freshwater and brackish marshes, low salinity tidal pools and coastal mangrove swamps. Fine-grained substrata usually make up the bottom of these waters.

Natural Range North Carolina or Virginia, the Bahamas and northern Gulf of Mexico to southeastern Brazil.

Minimum recommended tank size 135 gallons

Water Temperature 72 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (22-25 degrees Celsius)

Water Quality They do best in waters which are basically 25% saltwater in composition, but can live in full freshwater which is alkaline and hard. Their tank must be well-filtered; salt-tolerant plants may form a part of such a system.

Sexing Males may have more color, especially in the fins, than their female counterparts.

Breeding They breed well in a sand-bottomed tank with some sort of refuge from direct light. 200 tiny, golden, oblong eggs are laid on a hard surface. These eggs hatch in 48-96 hours. The fry absorb their yolk sac in 24 hours.

The male may be left in to guard the eggs and fry for two weeks, but if the aquarist decides to aerate the eggs, more fry may be raised without his protection.

The fry may take brine shrimp nauplii as a first food.

Feeding They eat copeopods, ostracods and insects in the wild (and incidentally ingest water hyacinth parts). They can eat flakes in the aquarium and may take them greedily. That having been said, some sources correctly say that there are a lot of D. maculatuses who won't eat prepared foods, so the aquarist should be prepared to feed his or her D. maculatus live foods (including live fishes) throughout their life.

Miscellaneous Info Originally described as Sciaena maculata by Bloch in 1792, it has since been renamed both as its current incarnation and Gobiomorus maculatus.

Sources:
"Complete Encyclopedia of the Freshwater Aquarium" by John Dawes
"American Aquarium Fishes" by Robert J. Goldstein
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